How Much Does Montessori School Cost?

All Montessori schools are independently operated, so the tuition for each location may extremely vary. Across the United States the monthly breakdown for a Montessori program could cost as much as $1,527 for infants, $1,214 for early childhood students, and $1,524 for secondary students. 


When it comes to cost or rate the area you live in may be a factor. If you live in the Northeast of the United States you can expect tuition rates to be above the average. However, those in the Midwest or southeast areas can expect to pay a little less. Your child’s age and school schedule you choose can also make a difference.

So How Much Does a Montessori School Really Cost?

Montessori schools are not just for rich and famous children and your child does not have to have a 160 IQ or have other special talents to attend. 

Montessori schools are for children of all backgrounds and abilities. In fact, Dr. Montessori created the Montessori teaching method for children of poverty, whom many had thought were unable to learn.

Normally, a Montessori education tuition varies by demographics as seen below:

 

  • California residents can expect to pay between $13,000 and $14,000 per year for toddlers and preschool and kindergarten children.
  • New York City residents can expect to pay an average range of $28,000 and $35,000 for the same.
  • An annual Montessori education in Chicago can be as high as $15,000 and $17,000 per year
  • In southern states such as Arkansas and Mississippi, average annual tuition of $7000 and $7500 is expected.

Why is Montessori School Expensive?

Why Montessori is so expensive comes down to the following reasons:

  • They have high-quality teaching staff. It’s sadly true that teachers are often extremely underpaid in public schools. Montessori schools are able to offer much higher salaries due to their income from tuition, which in turn tends to attract a very high-quality teaching staff!
  • It takes extra training to teach in the Montessori way. In addition to just having high-quality teachers, the staff also needs to be trained properly in the most effective Montessori methods. This adds to the cost, but also accounts for the very high level of education Montessori students receive.

Montessori teachers are vetted and chosen for their individualism. Teachers and their assistants must have a relevant bachelor’s degree and are required to complete a rigorous 2-year Montessori certification training.

Another reason why Montessori schools are so pricey is the teaching materials utilized. Students are taught language, math, and science through sensory aided, neurologically stimulating, and handcrafted materials such as sandpaper, letters, moveable wooden alphabets, and phonics cards.

No Cost Montessori Schools

For a less expensive option, consider a Montessori public school, which charge no tuition to students. There are several options throughout the U.S, from Arizona to Wisconsin. These offerings mostly cater to families with children in grades K-8. Public Montessori high schools are somewhat rare in the United States.

If a public school option is not available near you, you can find out if the private Montessori institution you are considering offers financial aid. Even a reduced tuition may be an option if more than one child from your family is enrolled in the school. Vouchers, tax credits, and Education Savings accounts may also be available for the Montessori schools in your state. This kind of education may be more accessible than you realize.

Is There Financial Aid for Montessori Schools?

Montessori schools do have financial aid assistance, as well as other funding programs that you could be eligible for. You may want to inquire about the different financial aid programs, even if your child is already enrolled in the school.

Some financial aid opportunities you may qualify for are:

  • Financial aid for needy families offered by private schools. Eligibility requirements vary from school to school, so you’ll need to contact the specific school you are interested in.
  • School voucher programs offered in some states may help you to offset your child’s education costs. Consult your chosen Montessori school for requirements and eligibility.
  • State sponsored individual tax credits & deduction programs reimburse a portion of a private school’s tuition. Reimbursement amounts vary from state to state.  
  • Some states allow you to use your Education Savings Accounts (ESA). Pay for your child’s education at a private Montessori school (up to $10,000).
  • Special Needs children (students) with an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Your child can be provided a free public education as mandated by the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Picking the Right Montessori School

There are several ways to select the right Montessori school for your child. You will first want to make sure the teachers are well qualified by sitting in on a class session, and making sure that The Montessori school of choice has child development values that match yours.

    Other ways to pick the right Montessori school are:

        • A good daily schedule. Are the children getting an interrupted 3-hour work period?
        • Class demographics and differences. Is there a smaller or larger age gap between students?
        • How are the children motivated? How are students rewarded for good work, and do they feel a sense of pride afterwards?
        • The level of parent dedication and attention required. Are you willing to physically watch, listen, and learn everything there is to know about Montessori and your child?

    Final Thoughts

    There are ways to introduce Montessori learning techniques to your kids at home while deciding on a school. Begin with Montessori books that bring the lifestyle and philosophy to your children, and Montessori toys and supplies, which can easily be purchased online. Montessori is a respected approach to education that many families stand by, and it just may be the right fit for you and your children.

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